Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is a popular novel published in 1886. this book related to many of the Victorian readers. During the Victorian period people lived two lives one side is the almost stiff powerful dull society with more concern of their reputation. However when they were in the comfort of their own homes, […]

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The importance of nature, in Hardy’s Tess of the D’urbervilles

Nature was extremely important in the Victorian era, after God and religion, Hardy shows the importance of nature throughout ‘Tess of the D’urbervilles’ by certain techniques of language and structure. Hardy uses nature to explain and portray aspects that happened within the Victorian society, and Tess’s life itself; there is always a underlying piece of […]

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Thomas Hardy's use of Imagery in Tess of the D'Urbervilles

Hardy uses imagery to foreshadow upcoming events which in turn creates a sense of dramatic irony to add a sense of foreboding and ominousness. In phase I, during Princes death, Hardy uses violent, sexual imagery in the line “The pointed shaft of the cart had entered the breast of the unhappy Prince” which can be […]

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ess of the D'Urbervilles

In Hardy’s tragic novel, nothing is as clear as it seems. Although Alec D’Urberville was the ostensible instigator of the protagonist Tess Durbeyfield’s downfall, it must be argued that Angel Clare plays just as a significant role in her destruction. Initial contemporary readings saw Tess and Angel’s relationship as doomed by Tess’ past, while more […]

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Thomas Hardy – analysis of three poems

An epitaph is an inscription upon a tomb, in few verses for the casual observer to read carefully. It is usually carved in stone and is very synthetic. The Elegy is much more lengthy than an epitaph. The two genres differ not only in lengths, but also in subject matter, since the epitaph is a […]

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Alec D'Urberville and Angel Clare in Tess of the D'Urbervilles

Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Hardy’s iconic novel, centres around the eponymous tragic heroine, Tess. Yet the tragedies that befall her in the course of the novel would not have occurred without the two leading male characters whom Tess encounters. The first is Tess’s ‘cousin’, Alec D’Urberville, whom she first meets in Chapter Five when she […]

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Hardy's Tess of the D'urbevilles is a product of its times

The context of Hardy’s Tess of the d’urbevilles strongly influences the text. Through values in the late 18th Century in areas such as gender, religion and class, we witness how ‘Tess of the d’urbevillies’ is a true product of its times and elucidates the ideologies and morals of its context. Purity, both sexual and moral, […]

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Richard II

John of Gaunt’s patriotic assault on the unpopular Richard would appeal greatly to the Shakespearean audience’s love for their country. Gaunt represents patriotism in the play, and is therefore the recipient of large amounts of sympathy from the audience. The death of such a well-liked character is particularly stirring. Richard’s mockery of “aged Gaunt” makes […]

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To What Extent Is Shakespeare's Richard II A Stereotypical Villain

When a stereotypical villain is imagined, ideas of ‘pantomime baddies’ and James Bond’s arch enemies appear. On the surface, these seem unlikely to relate to the character of Richard III in William Shakespeare’s play of the same name, however, on closer inspection character traits can be identified that seem very common between all of them. […]

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